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Strike up the band? Music, precarity and the cost of living crisis

Recent months have seen workers across many different industries take strike action in response to below-inflation pay offers in the midst of a cost-of-living crisis that shows no signs of ending, creating uncertainty for many.

What does this mean for musicians in Glasgow and beyond?

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Working in Music: 432 presents

I enrolled for the Music Industries degree with a background in community music. During my undergraduate studies at the University of Aberdeen, I had spent all of my academic and working life striving to take the formality out of making and experiencing music which I thoroughly enjoyed and continue to pursue, but as soon as […]

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The impact of music tourism on the post-pandemic live music economy

Since the comeback of the live music and travel industries post-pandemic, music tourism has seen a huge increase in the UK. Scotland reportedly brought in 1.5 million music tourists in 2022 who attended live music events. Events ranging from festivals such as TRNSMT and Celtic Connections and arena tours like Harry Styles and Dua Lipa […]

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Smalltown Boys and Immaterial Girls: Revisiting Bronski Beat in a post-SOPHIE Glasgow

In light of Glasgow becoming one of Europe’s top five queer destinations, Joy Kerr explores the legacies of two of the city’s most influential queer acts: Bronski Beat and SOPHIE. Despite the years between them, she finds pertinent parallels in both their ambivalent relationship with the city and defiance in the face of prejudice. I […]

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Glasgow: video star

Since the music video format became popular with the advent of MTV in the early 1980s, Glasgow has frequently provided a backdrop to musicians either performing or honing their acting ambitions with varying degrees of success.

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Artist-in-Residence #6: Life Without Buildings

Life Without Buildings were a short-lived but lovingly remembered band whose afterlife means that may be long gone but are not forgotten.   Formed in 1999 and disbanded in 2002, they were were part art-project, part pop band, equally at home on the two King Street venues that played an important part in their short […]

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Artist-in Residence #5: Christian

Chris McClure is one of Glasgow’s most remarkable performers. Still performing at the age of nearly 80, his career began in the social clubs of the 1960s. He was briefly part of the burgeoning beat group scene before returning to a more middle of the road oeuvre as Christian, the name under which he has […]

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Listen! A Visit to the Hen Hoose

Tamara Schlesinger tells Jen Logan about the all female and non-binary songwriting collective, Hen Hoose, as part of her Walking on Broken Glass podcast. Topics covered include her experience working as a woman in music, running a record label, and getting Hen Hoose off the ground.

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Artist-in-residence #4: Mogwai

Formed in 1995, Mogwai approach their thirtieth anniversary with a renewed vigour, following the success of their 2021 album, As The Love Continues, which yielded their first number 1 on the UK album charts. Their story is quite well documented, not least in Stuart Braithwaite’s forthcoming book, Spaceships Over Glasgow, but a shortened version goes […]

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What’s unique about Glasgow’s music scene?

Glasgow is renowned for its strong, vibrant and diverse music scene. It has been named the UK’s top cultural and creative city and is a UNESCO city of music. Consistently praised for its iconic venues, it hosts more live music events than any other city in Scotland. As Adam Behr notes, “to be a “music […]

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From Brazil to the Barrowland

‘Sepultura, from Brazil! One, two, three, four…’. For over two decades now, this phrase has been shouted from the stage every time Brazilian metal band Sepultura are about to play their biggest hit: Roots Bloody Roots, featured on the band’s sixth studio album, Roots (1996). On the stages of Glasgow alone, this sequence of events […]

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Artist-in-Residence #3: Lena Martell

Lena Martell was the first Scottish woman to top the UK charts as a solo artist in 1979, when her version of Kris Kristofferson’s One Day at a Time was a global hit, selling 2.5 million copies in the UK and also topping the charts in three other countries.  Martell’s short period as a pop […]

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